food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl. food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl. food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl. food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl. food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl. food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl. food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.
Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl.

food52:

So do we, Robert Downey Jr. So do we.

Read more: How to Make a French Omelette on Food52.

I have not yet mastered the French Omelette, but with Robert Downey Jr. egging (ha! see what I did here?) me on, I think I’ll give it another whirl.

"Instead of studying Locke, for instance, or writing - I go make an apple pie, or study The Joy Of Cooking, reading it like a rare novel."
— Sylvia Plath (via rifflefood)

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

How to Make a Cauliflower Pizza Crust…RECIPE

gifs and a recipe. 

VISUALLY YUMMY!

(Source: beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood)

dietkiller:

Strawberry Grapefruit Smoothie

Now that I’m a California girl I have every excuse to buy as much citrus and strawberries as possible. Seriously, I cannot get enough. 

Though this is a bit on the high sugar side (it’s NATURAL sugar people, reeeelllax) for a smoothie this is a GLORIOUS recipe. If I was going for a less sugary option, I would throw a few mild greens in or even better yet carrot juice. And on the other hand if I was feeling really wild a splash of gin would make this a perfect slushy cocktail.

Strawberry-Grapefruit Smoothies
from Whole Living, May 2012

Ingredients:
1 ruby red or pink grapefruit, seeded and segmented
2 c. hulled fresh or frozen strawberries
1 sweet apple, such as Honeycrisp or Pink Lady, cored and chopped
1 (1-in.) piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
1/2 c. water, plus more as desired

Directions:
1.  Combine all ingredients in a blender and process until smooth.  Taste for thickness and texture and add more water, if desired.  Drink immediately or keep in the refrigerator until ready to drink.  If keeping, shake vigorously or blend in the blender before drinking.  

Yield: 2 servings

food52:

Watch an ugly duckling turn into a swan.
Read more: Rutabagas à la Greque on Food52.

Mmmm what a glorious way to showcase an oft overlooked root vegetable! Check out the recipe below adapted by Food52 from the legendary vegetable guru Alice Waters:
Author Notes: Adapted from Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food II, Clarkson Potter 2014. - Marian Bull
Serves 4
1 large or 2 small rutabagas (about 1 pound)3 cups water3/4 cups white wine vinegar1/4 cup white wine1 hefty pinch peppercorns1 hefty pinch coriander seeds1 hefty pinch mustard seeds2 large (or 4 small) cloves of garlic, peeled and halved2 chile pods4 thyme sprigs4 marjoram sprigs (or 1 pinch dried marjoram)Salt
Peel the rutabagas, then cut them into 1/4-inch slices. If you want a little more stability, cut them in half and then slice them into half-moons. Measure all other ingredients into a medium-size pot. Add enough salt so the liquid tastes salty (but not inedible) — one generous pinch is a good start. Bring everything to a boil, then simmer for 3 minutes. Be warned: your kitchen will smell like vinegar. Add the rutabaga slices, trying to get all of them submerged. Cook them until they’re tender, but not too soft — a knife should pierce them easily but you don’t want them to fall apart. This should take about 15 minutes. Let the slices cool in the liquid. Serve as is, or drizzled with salsa verde — Alice says they’re better the next day, and I agree. You can store them in the liquid for up to a week or so. Note: You can really put anything you like into the cooking liquid. Experiment with other herbs and spices, like fennel seeds, bay leaves, ginger, etc. Express yourself! food52:

Watch an ugly duckling turn into a swan.
Read more: Rutabagas à la Greque on Food52.

Mmmm what a glorious way to showcase an oft overlooked root vegetable! Check out the recipe below adapted by Food52 from the legendary vegetable guru Alice Waters:
Author Notes: Adapted from Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food II, Clarkson Potter 2014. - Marian Bull
Serves 4
1 large or 2 small rutabagas (about 1 pound)3 cups water3/4 cups white wine vinegar1/4 cup white wine1 hefty pinch peppercorns1 hefty pinch coriander seeds1 hefty pinch mustard seeds2 large (or 4 small) cloves of garlic, peeled and halved2 chile pods4 thyme sprigs4 marjoram sprigs (or 1 pinch dried marjoram)Salt
Peel the rutabagas, then cut them into 1/4-inch slices. If you want a little more stability, cut them in half and then slice them into half-moons. Measure all other ingredients into a medium-size pot. Add enough salt so the liquid tastes salty (but not inedible) — one generous pinch is a good start. Bring everything to a boil, then simmer for 3 minutes. Be warned: your kitchen will smell like vinegar. Add the rutabaga slices, trying to get all of them submerged. Cook them until they’re tender, but not too soft — a knife should pierce them easily but you don’t want them to fall apart. This should take about 15 minutes. Let the slices cool in the liquid. Serve as is, or drizzled with salsa verde — Alice says they’re better the next day, and I agree. You can store them in the liquid for up to a week or so. Note: You can really put anything you like into the cooking liquid. Experiment with other herbs and spices, like fennel seeds, bay leaves, ginger, etc. Express yourself!

food52:

Watch an ugly duckling turn into a swan.

Read more: Rutabagas à la Greque on Food52.

Mmmm what a glorious way to showcase an oft overlooked root vegetable! Check out the recipe below adapted by Food52 from the legendary vegetable guru Alice Waters:

Author Notes: Adapted from Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food II, Clarkson Potter 2014. - Marian Bull

Serves 4

1 large or 2 small rutabagas (about 1 pound)
3 cups water
3/4 cups white wine vinegar
1/4 cup white wine
1 hefty pinch peppercorns
1 hefty pinch coriander seeds
1 hefty pinch mustard seeds
2 large (or 4 small) cloves of garlic, peeled and halved
2 chile pods
4 thyme sprigs
4 marjoram sprigs (or 1 pinch dried marjoram)
Salt

Peel the rutabagas, then cut them into 1/4-inch slices. If you want a little more stability, cut them in half and then slice them into half-moons. Measure all other ingredients into a medium-size pot. Add enough salt so the liquid tastes salty (but not inedible) — one generous pinch is a good start. Bring everything to a boil, then simmer for 3 minutes. Be warned: your kitchen will smell like vinegar. Add the rutabaga slices, trying to get all of them submerged. Cook them until they’re tender, but not too soft — a knife should pierce them easily but you don’t want them to fall apart. This should take about 15 minutes. Let the slices cool in the liquid. Serve as is, or drizzled with salsa verde — Alice says they’re better the next day, and I agree. You can store them in the liquid for up to a week or so. Note: You can really put anything you like into the cooking liquid. Experiment with other herbs and spices, like fennel seeds, bay leaves, ginger, etc. Express yourself!

lauraemily:

Goodnight Hollywood. #sunsetsandpets (at The Grove)

Attention Tumblrs I have moved to California!

And yes while it was bittersweet to leave my Brooklyn kitchen and my usual food haunts, there is SO much to explore in Los Angeles.

Did I mention that LA is a gluten-free paradise? Everyone is so health conscious here that it’s not nearly as difficult to find celiac-friendly fare wherever one goes. It’s pretty inspiring to have a bounty of options (don’t even get me started on the glory that is an LA farmers market) at my fingertips, I’ve been re-energized to really cook again.

So here’s to a new year, a new home, and everything that LA and 2014 want to throw at me, because I am so ready.

Let’s face it, we all want to look decent in a swimsuit, and despite the still chilly weather, those summer months are creeping up! These brownies look pretty tasty, and at 37 calories a pop, how can we resist?

gastrogirl:

37 calorie brownies.

For the brownies:

3/4 cup nonfat greek yogurt (I used Fage 0%)
1/4 cup skim milk
1/2 cup Cocoa powder
1/2 cup Old fashioned rolled oats (like Quaker)
1/2 cup Truvia (or any natural/stevia based sweetener that pours like sugar)
1 egg
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 pinch salt

Preheat the oven to400°F. Grease a square baking dish (I used 8”x8”). Combine all incredients into a food processor or a blender, and blend until smooth (about 1 minute). Pour into the prepared dish and bake for about 15 minutes. Allow to cool completely before cutting into 9 large squares. YAHM.

Optional: I added about 1/4 cup of chocolate chips to my batter, just to live dangerously. This brings the calorie count up to about 65 calories per brownie. Not bad, not bad.