therealduckandpenguin:

lawful:

fullcredit:

This is the most accurate sentence that has ever been said on national television. 

Truth.

Excellent.

Ha! So very very true.

(Source: amysantiaago)

Because there are NEVER enough tacos.

americastestkitchen:

Straight out of the fridge, store-bought tortillas are lackluster in flavor, cold, and unbendable.

Here are 2 methods to warm them, a tortilla storage tip, and our recipe for Steak Tacos.

See how to make your own tortillas and learn the secrets to Mexican Classics on America’s Test Kitchen

hipsterfood:

This is one of those things I’ve been dying to try making for years, but never got around to it because it seemed hard. On the contrary, it only took about an hour out of my weekend and made the house smell amazing - and now I’ve made enough to last me a few weeks! So if you’re interested in drinking hot, sweet, spicy, complex chai, try this out and save yourself years (!) of just thinking about it.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp each ground cardamom, nutmeg, black peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp whole cloves
  • 1-inch piece of ginger root, sliced into medallions
  • 2-3 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 vanilla bean pod, sliced open
  • 3 pieces star anise
  • 3-4 tablespoons whole-leaf black tea leaves - we used Earl Grey Creme c/o The Tea Company
  • 3/4 cup molasses or sugar (such as sugar in the raw)
  • 4 cups boxed coconut milk (found in the refrigerated section) - we used canned coconut milk but found it too fatty for this drink. Almond milk would also work in this recipe.

Other equipment you’ll need: a fine-mesh bag and a mesh strainer, a funnel if you’re working with small openings, also a large glass bottle with a top for storage.

If you don’t care so much about the residue of powdered spices, a mesh strainer will work just fine by itself. Use whole spices, alternatively.

Get a stronger tea by using whole spices instead of ground, and/or let the mixture steep on the stove longer.

Instructions

  1. Pour all of the ingredients into a pot and turn the heat to medium. Stir to combine and let sit for about 40 minutes, partially covered, stirring every so often.
  2. Put your mesh bag (or the mesh strainer, if you’ve used whole spices instead of ground) into a large bowl and pour the tea in. Let it strain through, then pour into your storage bottle. I did mine in batches so it was easier to pour.
  3. When you’re ready to make drinks, fill your cup(s) up halfway, then the rest with a strongly brewed straight-up hot black tea. Top with a dusting of cinnamon and drink it up!
  4. If you’re using this later on, after it’s been refrigerated, just shake it a bunch of times before you pour it out - sometimes it’s even nice to use the metal mesh strainer again, just as you pour it into glasses, to strain out any lumps.

These ingredients make about 4 cups of chai “concentrate”, but you could easily just keep adding more coconut milk as you empty the pot and reuse the spices a few times. I ended up making about 4 batches total, because I love chai so much. It’s a really warming drink that is so comforting as it keeps snowing here every few days. Hope you enjoy it!

This looks like an excellent approximation of the chai I drank on my recent trip to India.  As I’ve never had anything remotely like it in the States, I will definitely attempt this recipe and report back. 

  1. Camera: Nikon D5000
  2. Aperture: f/3.2
  3. Exposure: 1/80th
  4. Focal Length: 50mm

glutenfreefoodporn:

jesusduggar:

What Gluten Free Really Means

This is really great. 

This is a pretty concise and entertaining explanation, super easy to pass along to family and friends when you’re first diagnosed with Celiac and they haven’t the faintest idea what being gluten free actually means.

(Source: youtube.com)

food52:

Risotto, polenta, and grits all get the savory treatment — why shouldn’t oats?

Read more: Oatmeal: It’s Not Just For Breakfast on Food52.

Couldn’t agree more. I love to slice up 1/4 of an avocado, throw in some grape tomatoes, and either parsley or cilantro with a dash of salt and pepper. Complete oatmeal game changer.

lillysun8 Asked
QuestionI just started dated a gluten free guy (I'm not). I love to make muffins and used to make them for boyfriends but I am really intimidated to bake without wheat flour. What is your simplest recipe that is sure to please? Something nutritious as well. We both try to eat healthy. Answer

Great question! I’ve actually been trying to eat a bit healthier myself (my boyfriend and I are dabbling in Paleo recipes) and I have had amazing luck with a Banana Nut Chocolate Chip muffin recipe I found on PaleoOMG. I’ve made these muffins 4-5 times in the past 2 months and my boyfriend cannot get enough of them. I have pasted the PaleoOMG recipe below, but just a few tips: I can usually get 10-12 muffins out of this, I use a regular muffin pan w/paper muffin cups, and I use whatever Chocolate Chips I have on hand as I have a hard time coughing up the $$ for the Evolved Baking Chocolate.  Regardless, if you follow this recipe to the letter you will get killer muffins that also happen to be gluten-free and tasty!

Banana Nut Chocolate Chip Muffins
Serves: 9
Ingredients
  • 3 bananas, mashed with a fork
  • 3 eggs, whisked
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ cup smooth almond butter
  • ¼ cup coconut flour
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts
  • ½ cup 72% Eating Evolved Baking Chocolate, chopped into pieces (or other chocolate chips you like)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. Mash bananas in a large bowl. Add eggs, maple syrup, almond butter, and vanilla extract and mix together.
  3. Then add coconut flour, cinnamon, baking soda and powder and a pinch of salt and mix well.
  4. Lastly, fold in walnuts and chocolate chips.
  5. Use an ice cream scoop to scoop batter into 9 cups of a silicone muffin pan.
  6. Bake for 25 minutes. Let cool before removing from silicone pan.
food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries… food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.
Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.
I wonder if this would also work for cherries…

food52:

Hear that? It’s your inner hulk calling.

Read more: 9 Ways to Use a Meat Pounder on Food52.

Pitting olives. Because some people think that doing this by hand is cathartic, but for most of us it is simply a pain in the butt. Crowd a few olives together, give them a good bang!, then swiftly pull out their pits.

I wonder if this would also work for cherries…

frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.
Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.
The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.
When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.
Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.
Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.
There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.
Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.
Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.
One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.
frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.
Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.
The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.
When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.
Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.
Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.
There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.
Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.
Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.
One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.
frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.
Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.
The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.
When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.
Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.
Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.
There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.
Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.
Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.
One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.
frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.
Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.
The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.
When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.
Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.
Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.
There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.
Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.
Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.
One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.

frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.

Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.

The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.

When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.

Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.

Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.

There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.

Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.

Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.

One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.

americastestkitchen:

Gluten-Free Light and Fluffy Biscuits

Biscuits and gravy? Strawberry shortcakes? Straight-up biscuits action?

Our gluten-free version tastes terrific, plain and simple.

Make It Now: Our Recipe for Gluten-Free Biscuits

Get this recipe and 180 groundbreaking gluten-free recipes in our newest book, The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook

Using psyillium husk to strengthen the dough hmm? I admit, it’s not something that I would have thought of, but I love that someone else figured it out, as I have yet to make a GF biscuit that cuts the mustard.

I need to get my hands on this cookbook ASAP!

gluten-free-yogi:

johnsgunn:

Gluten free problems.

This has been happening to me so much too lately! At least the last 5 loaves.  As if the stuff doesn’t cost enough to begin with!

Ugh! So frustrating! When one has to pay upwards of $5-6 for a loaf of bread, how is it even remotely fair that half the loaf is missing? I am a fan of Udi’s products, but they really need to work on their quality control or else I’ll have to reconsider my bread purchases.